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20120901
20120930
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this morning. they'll just try to get a share of the touch screen market in the united states. to your point about cash going out, more smart phones being sold than expected it is still a big shortage so the move today, is that indicative of -- >> they're not going out of business. >> even though the core operations remain unprofitable. their cash build was 2.3 from 2.2 on the quarter. >> they had more cash than previously. >> and their shipments continue to go down. they bleed people. >> you have the developing countries now. >> the pricing pressure is greater. >> there's always ban thought someone would buy them. but people felt why buy them because they'll run out of money and when they run out of money you can get them for nothing and you get all that intellectual property for nothing. there's a lot of companies that wish they had that keyboard patent. maybe that is worth something. i'm just saying that, look. i want the blackberry 10 to ship earlier. i thought becky's interview was terrific. it's very difficult to be as negative as you might have been before knowing that the restructuri
percentage of its revenues come from outside the united states and this is a smaller market cap as a spinoff so it was a logical replacement. >> i will see you first, don't buy united health. there's very little money. my hands are different color from my face. what does that mean? there's makeup. >> the dow jones industrial average, the price pointed index which should have absolutely no meaning but they have to keep doing it that way because that's the way they started. everybody follows the s&p but we talk about the dow jones because that's what you hear about on the radio. >> this is the opportunity for the dow to go higher. kraft very levered to commodity costs. particularly we know that the big inflationary trend is food. okay? and they're a huge buyer of all of these commodities. united health, very little commodity costs so you get kind of an inflation break that deals with ben's pro-inflation strategy yesterday. >> this is the first change to the dow jones industrial average since 2009. just to your point that nobody follows the dow jones industrial average, how much money is actual
're quite anxious to find a partner in the united states to roll it through america. talk me through that, if you would. >> this is a start in one of our hotels as a food and beverage outlet in t2000. people kept asking me who owns the franchise nor the noodle house, we want one in our place. i said, we own the franchise. so we started to put a whole franchise and team together on what i hope will be, and i think we have achieved it on a very professional basis. and when then we started to franchise in other units. we started with six units we own and operate in dubai. now we are operating 20 across the world. we actually have 123 signed up in our pipeline. and we would very much like to be in the united states. we have had discussions, serious discussions about taking the name out there on a franchise basis. so it just really grew out of one of the -- as a restaurant outfit in one of the hotels. >> let me ask you finally, you're a member of the hotel industry and you sit on one of the boards, and it is an industry finding its voice saying, we are and saying, look, we are jobs, we are gro
the united states. the only time i've ever had a break is when i was on maternity leave. i have retired from doing this one thing that i loved. now, i'm going to be able to have the time to explore something different. it's like another chapter. there's natural gas under my town. it's a game changer. ♪ it means cleaner, cheaper american-made energy. but we've got to be careful how we get it. design the wells to be safe. thousands of jobs. use the most advanced technology to protect our water. billions in the economy. at chevron, if we can't do it right, we won't do it at all. we've got to think long term. we've got to think long term. ♪ for the spender who needs a little help saving. for adding "& sons." for the dreamer, planning an early escape. for the mother of the bride. for whoever you are, for whatever you're trying to achieve, pnc has technology, guidance, and over 150 years of experience to help you get there. ♪ >>> "squawk box" keeping our eyes on the prize, its eight a "squawk" oil summit. the smartest minds in the industry. >>> safeguarding your online reputation. the founde
, it's still actually quite sticky in the united states. badly there needs to be a dose of fiscal consolidation. we would say it's going to be 1.5% of gdp. in the eurozone it's -- if the uk it's 1.25. >> good to see you today. thanks for joining us. >>> german chancellor angela merkel is preparing for yet another meeting today -- >> how is she doing? >> it's one after another after another. she is set to hold talks with herman von rompuy. she's been having down time and having a few beers at a german beer festival. >> this is how she does it. >> the german chancellor did get on stage and called on germany to have solidarity. >> is she on the stage? there she is. i wonder if she would have a sash and flowers. she looks quite happy. >> she just wants the beer. >> is that post the beer? she looks like she's enjoying herself. >> love it. >> where do we go on the road to the beer festival? >> oktoberfest. >>> still to come, president obama is set to make his pitch for four more years in the white house as the democratic convention kicks off. could the real focus be on friday's jobs rep
but also in the united states. the global issue has been a subject john has been involved, the ceo of eli lilly. nice to see you. let's see this issue of leadership. clerly the onus with central banks doing as much as they can in terms of turning around the global economy. the emphasis is very much on a political class in europe that is fighting its own corners, and in a clearly divided political class in the united states. can't we achieve this sort of leadership the world needs economically? >> we're in a tough situations that's been years in the making and i think it will be years to work our way out of it. there's an old saying as elected democracies we get the leaders we deserve. different views on our leaders reflect a certain divisiveness on leaders. some of the comment i made here yesterday of the position i would take, and i think we should be looking toward from the perspective of anyone who runs a company is leadership that takes a long-term view when temptations are otherwise to deal only with the short term. and leadership insofar as possible in this time of turbulence can pr
. of course, obama's speech comes at a time when the united states is facing a very difficult situation in the middle east. we saw the ongoing protests, and of course, anti-u.s. sentiment is at relatively high in terms of its historical sort of context. but again, peace is hard is what obama made very clear in his speech. a warning shot to the remaining dictators in the region. also saying that countries like bahrain, which is a neighbor to saudi arabia, the world's top oil exporter, that the reform needs to happen there as well. what a lot of observers were hoping for is that there would be more of a focus on syria and iran. president obama spent quite a bit of his speech talk about the palestinian-israeli conflict and the tensions there. but when it comes to syria, he said the united nations need to act on that front. the united states is not going to just stand by. they have to overcome the pretty much resistance from other countries like russia and china in the united nations security council. but when it comes to iran, united states making it clear that they will do what they must,
's the best case scenario. >> does allow us to focus on the united states. >> exactly. >> we're probably doing better than any economy in the world. >> you're not trying to whistle past graveyards on that front, right? you're not trying to ignore europe. >> melissa mentioned the trading perspective. i think that the traders are saying, okay, now, what do we have here, and when we look at here, well, why don't we see with the steel industry, the auto industry. we focus -- the fill lebeau interview was incredibly important where allan mull ha ly says europe, we don't have it. the truth is united states has it. 14.5 million vehicles. that is a bull market in cars. >> right. >> we are talking about this upgrade today. sun trust, why is sun trust upgraded? i think that's very significant, not just because my trust owns it, but i'm looking at sun trust saying that is, again, the housing market in the south because the federal reserve didn't like sun trust. housing, autos, retail. what else do we need? >> right. >> well, we could use china to start growing a little bit faster instead of going the oth
been made of their failure to invest and promote the pepsi brand for soda within the united states. how relevant now is the home market for investors when, for example, coke is suggesting they will invest $30 billion over the next two or three years with the bot lers to double consumption around the world? >> it's a great question. so there's been a terrific change of heart at pepsi. this year about $600 million of advertising spending behind the businesses, the bulk of that is going to happen in north america. you probably just saw they sign add deal with the nfl. clearly they feel the pressure and want to start growing some of their businesses here at home again. >> and how does that compare to mao tau kent and the mass everybody bottlers worldwide. >> remember, coke bought their bottle in the u.s. so they have a lot more skin in the game. the good die naming here on the beverage side is guys are kind of getting along and playing nicely for the first time in a while. i think they want to make more money. they're cognizant of the economic. they're making the pack sizes smaller and lift
their friends in southern europe and indeed the economy here in the united states. michelle caruso-cabrera will talk about some of the bad pigs in a minute, but first senior economics reporter steve liesman with the story of some vindicated doves. >> because the new game is called "bad piggies." that's where we're coming from. >> and we're only doing this because the producer jason gawertz made us do this. he said could we think of an app that would apply with today's data and i did. it's called vindicated doves. at least initially here, why is that? because essentially the economic data came in weak. let me show you what the economic data showed. the numbers come in you're looking for 5.6% positive -- or negative. you get minus 13.2 off a prior 3.27%. i think the dove says i don't care i had this one right. gdp took .4 off the prior print right there. midwest manufacturing down negative. p and pending home sales much changed from the prior month from positive to negative. take a look at some of the comments here. vindicated doves. anyone facing doubt about the need forred 23ed's r
as well as in the united states. >> markets saying these figures point to eurozone contraction of 0.5% in qe. what's your outlook? >> it's in line with our numbers. we think for the full year the eurozone contracts at 0.4% rate, so not far off what you suggested and that seems to be consistent with the underlying data coming in. no real revisions just yet but we'll watch and wait. >> what about 2013, is that a year -- 2012 we see europe broadly contracting. what about 2013? >> a lot hinges on the global environment. hinges on whether the u.s. can slowly grow and maybe grow a bit faster. whether china can begin to pick up steam. external stories can be critical for europe. >> larry will stay with us. let's check in and check out market reaction. >> one hour into european trading session. 73 declining outpacers. ftse 100 down 1.5% yesterday. down 0.5%. dragged yesterday by u.s. disappointing. the xet ra dax down 0.3%. ibex down after a good rise in july. keep your eye on bond rates. yesterday we had a nice rally in spain on two-year. ten-year, 6.62%. that's slightly higher on the sess
in france, germany, the uk and the bae largest customer, the united states. so where do we go from here? katherine boyle joins us, she's been writing about this online. a very good morning to you. let's talk about the impediments to something getting done. which is the biggest one in your opinion? >> well, i don't think you're going to see much political interference actually because i've heard from sources that in fact the main government evolved in the european side have all been consulted off the record and have given the nod. of course that didn't mean that there aren't other governments that could cause some trouble. as you mentioned, be have boeing, but we also have lockheed martin and northrup who are even bigger players in the defense market. >> and it raises the question is it a bigger deal for civilian air space market or defense. and obviously it's defense. >> the u.s. defense market which is still the world's biggest by several multiples. and why there's been a lot of noise about saudi arabia and china and other countries which are sort of bunch onin burgeoni. >> they need t
framework in the united states. we look at the fed. one of the greatest threats to the u.s. and the capitalism really is academics and bureaucrats that really run our entire regulatory framework in the u.s. and they run the federal reserve. we need risk it takers. people that have actually taken risk to be in the regulatory framework. if you look at the crash of 2008, who is making all the decisions? it was hank paulson, someone from wall street. and we have a situation all these years later where if you look at the fdic, the futures trading commission, the regulatory infrastructure doesn't have approach risk takers. and that's a big threat. >> it sounds like you think the fed are taking risks. >> i've been behind the scenes taking to hedge fund managers. these are complete experimental drugs, they don't have an exit strategy. they want to make us feel good with academic contrived jargon, but this is a massive experiment. and what i'm worried about, think about in the united states we have a trillion dollars in pensions. they're underfundeded compared to '08. that's a pro
're seeing through the lens. how are things both in the united states and europe. >> and china? >> let's talk about the u.s. in almost every business, there are pockets of real success. let's take, for example, the enormous burst in rental housing. the command for rental housing is incredible. so we're in the home supply business. we do cabinet doors, home depot, supply, we do vanities and things like that. we sell vanity kits as fast as you possibly make to landlocked and multifamily housing who put these things in. we charge $500, they increase the rent $100 a month, the pay back is in months, and the game is on. people are renovating rental places and motels and hotels because they're occupied. three years ago they were taking a room in a motel, tearing it apart, bringing the fixture over and fixing the other room that was leaking. now they're renovating those things. so the home rental idea is moving strongly. you take the marcellus fields, we can't get pipe up there fast enough. we can't get pre-fab buildings up there fast enough. i mean, i'm not talking marcellus, i'm talking north dako
are basically mandated with the task of a medium to long-term sort of united states of europe kind of plan which involves fiscal, more fiscal union and political union and most interestingly i detect more and more some sort of thoughts about more parliamentary responsibility, so therefore a bit more accountability and democracy so he knew all of that before he said what he said six weeks ago and he certainly knew that he'd gotten merkel behind him in my view. >> george soros has an op. ed piece, he says germany needs to lead or leave and if a germany were to leave, the euro would depreciate, the debt burden remain the same in nominal terms and debtor companies would regain their competitiveness and the value of their real estate would also appreciate in nominal terms. do you buy that? >> i can't resist in teasing him a bit. he must be dabbling around in mantis united shares going to his head. without germany there is no euro. the idea germany leaves and the rest carry on is a non-starter. i don't understand why someone like george is saying that. >> i want to see his book, whenever he says anyth
you cannot get any yield. everyone is chasing yield. you can't get it from the united states government. they'll pay you nothing. people are going say, wait a minute, now i have to pay 36% and i have risk in the marketplace. these are a lot of big issues. >> i know you meant governor romney. >> let me apologize. >> do you think we go to the election and are in standstill mode until then? once we get the clarity of who's in the white house, what's your expectation? >> i do. i don't anticipate a lot. i know people are talking about that we'll see more in the early parts of november because of the different things with the defense department and where they're going to be at as far as cuts go. we'll get an indication what's going to happen. i think we'll have to wait until the election is over and done with and we'll get clarity for the future of the markets. >> i really like the fact you're looking at this whole dividend issue. we've been talking about the fiscal cliff a lot on this program. do you really think these guys are going to allow dif vidend taxes to go to 43%? >> they
by examining 113 indicators from official data sources and polling 15,000 executives. united states continued a four-year slide to the seventh spot. separately, a judge ruling amr can abandon its pilot's union contract. saying the bankrupt parent of american airlines corrected certain issues that caused him to reject the same request in the past. amr is trying to save more than $1 billion a year in labor costs. it can unilaterally impose work terms on its pilot, all is happening as talks between amr and u.s. air continue. >>> in the meantime, a very complicated story. we've been trying to follow the twists and turns. the fbi now says there is no evidence to support claims that hacking group anonymous infiltrated an fbi agent's laptop and lifted data for more than 12 million apple products. however the front page of "the financial times" lays it out and says hackers embarrass apple with this data release. there were over a million different devices, numbers were published online. this is a story that has many odd twists. the hackers said they would not give any interviews about this breach unt
bag. i mean, the math is done a little bit differently in the united states, you having done a ph.d. at harvard. they are taking care of the problem, aren't they? they are in the process? >> well, they are talking about it. i don't think they are doing any meaningful things, because in the u.s. political system, you really have to have the president, the white house, and the congress working together. and currently, the two parties are not even talking the same language oftentimes. so i do hope whatever the outcome of the presidential election in the u.s., the two parties, the administration and the parliament, the congress should work together. >> yeah, their philosophies are farther apart than ever. it's two different americas. what are you saying then? you're saying with the prospect of still a possible qe3, that a serious debasement of the dollar devaluation -- almost like a deliberate devaluation of the dollar is going to enter the conversation here? is that what you're alluding to? >> no. what i'm saying is the u.s. financial crisis is a monumental, historical event. the con
of volume in the afternoon because there will be no incentive from the united states. euro/sterling, down a little bit. after that manufacturing pmi number came much better than expected. so interestingly enough, employment stilg still picking up in manufacturing. although it's still in contractionary territory. if you like pmi, you'll like china for the last couple of days. >> i think, ross, asian bourses mostly finished higher despite down beat manufacturing numbers from china. analysts say those weak readings could prompt supported policies from the central bank. the gape, 0.6% gold liner search off future fed. developers rally following the comments on building more affordable housing. the hang seng followed suit, helped by congress congress property place and internet giants. turning negative in late trade to end at a four-week low. lost over 6% after it proposed to revise down its stake back in march. energy places and industrials sent the kospi higher by .4%. samsung electronics lost a round after apple targeted four more cents on products. the afx 200 eked out modest gains, higher
has been happening this morning? those viewers in the united states waking up, why are the apple workers in paris upset? >> for the last week, they've been extremely it is grunt he willed. all over the french media, they've been meeting with different management, complaining, in pact one of them was quoted as saying working at apple is like working in a coal mine. they've been complaining that they have to work longer hours than what they're paid for, that they don't get any commissions uneven though they're under constant pressure to sell. they're monitored by cameras in the stores and looking for things like a 13th month of pay as a bonus, higher pay and water fountains in the store. some of these things are standards for french workers, but they're complaining that apple has been extremely resistant to provide them these things. in fact they say they've been fighting for three years for the 13th month of pay. so at the end of yesterday, there was a sort of last resort meeting at which it was decided that these issues would be revisited before the end of the year, that the comp
camera again is everybody wants equal opportunity and fairness in the united states. it's just when that breaks down and you don't think it's fair. and you know what else plays into it? is corporate cronyism and the kablt ability to succeed but not to fail. we talk about these things in a perfect world. and it's not perfect. and that's when we get things that need to be rectified and people feel like they're getting screwed, basically. >> no, there's a feeling, and the feeling is enhanced in a downturn, a bubbly economy is when people feel better. i have to add these problems may seem, you know, to be challenges for us. they're big challenges in other places. >> worse than here. >> oh, yeah. india has had momentum stall and a loss of investor confidence from some really dumb stuff. >> you think we can get our mojo back, mike? >> oh, yeah. >> you do? >> yeah, i think so. partly because there's so many parts of the economy on the private sector side that are dynamic and functioning fine. i think people will get motivated and get back in the game. the real question marks frankly on our
Search Results 0 to 20 of about 21